4 Dos and Don’ts When Writing Songs

Posted in MusicWorld on June 19, 2013 by Cliff Goldmacher#grayscale’);”>#grayscale’); line-height: 16px; margin-left: 3px; margin-right: 3px; position: relative; z-index: 1;”> #grayscale’);”>#grayscale’); line-height: 16px; margin-left: 3px; margin-right: 3px; position: relative; z-index: 1;”> #grayscale’);”>#grayscale’); line-height: 16px; margin-left: 3px; margin-right: 3px; position: relative; z-index: 1;”>#grayscale’); padding-left: 20px; padding-right: 3px; white-space: nowrap;”>LinkedIn
“Which do you write first, the music or the words?” This is the classic question that all songwriters get asked. In my experience, there’s no easy – or correct – answer to this one. Sometimes it’s the music, sometimes it’s the lyrics, and, often, it’s some mystical, organic combination of the two. More importantly, there is no one way to write a song. Some of the best – and worst – songs ever written were created using the same techniques. To that end, I’m going to cover four different ways to approach writing a song and some of the “dos” and “don’ts” you’ll want to keep in mind as you go through each one.
1. Writing based on a title idea/lyrical hook
Coming up with a really catchy title or lyrical hook is an art in and of itself. If you’ve got one, congratulations. Now that you’ve got it, here are a few things to keep in mind.
Do remember to make sure that everything in your lyric points to and supports your lyrical hook. Having a catchy hook only works if you build a foundation around it so that when the hook arrives, there’s a sense of drama and release.
Don’t forget to give the song real emotional content. It’s possible to be so focused on the hook and setting it up that you forget to be sincere. While the average listener might not be able to tell you why, the song won’t move them in the way that a song with genuine emotional content would.

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